New Japan law aims at Unification Church fundraising abuses

New Japan law aims at Unification Church fundraising abuses: The long-standing connections between the South Korean-based religious organization and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party in Japan came to light following the murder of former leader Shinzo Abe in July. In an effort to quell public outrage over his handling of the scandal, Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, whose approval ratings plummeted, has replaced three Cabinet members: one due to his church connections, another due to a gaffe involving the death penalty, and a third due to issues with political funding.

Japan law aims at Unification Church 

The new law, which was approved at this year’s final parliamentary session, permits believers, other donors, and their families to seek the return of their money and forbids religious groups and other organizations from raising money through coercion, threats, or claims that donations will result in salvation from the afterlife.

After hearing about the sufferings of former followers, Kishida called their experiences “ghastly” and lauded the bill as a bipartisan effort to assist the victims and their families.

One of Kishida’s primary aims, along with Japan’s new national security strategy and defence policy to achieve significant growth of the military over the following five years, was the approval of the law.

The government will require an additional 4 trillion yen ($30 billion) a year, according to Kishida, who earlier this week set five-year defence spending targets of 43 trillion yen ($316 billion). A portion of that must be paid for through

Kishida stated on Saturday that Japan must maintain its military strength for longer than the next five years. He declared that the proposed tax hike will start to take effect gradually in 2024 and that the income tax won’t change. He declared that he opposed issuing government bonds to pay for the increased defence spending.

“In order to strengthen our defence capabilities for the future, we must secure the source of funds, “added Kishida. “We owe it to future generations to act in this way.”

Due to the constitutional guarantee to freedom of religion, experts say it would be challenging for the church’s legal standing to be revoked as a result of the probe. Because his party’s coalition partner, Komeito, is supported by a religious organisation, the Buddhist sect Soka Gakkai, opposition MPs calling for harsher regulations accuse Kishida of being slack. Support for the Kishida administration has plummeted as a result of how he handled the church crisis. Asserting his lack of affiliation with the religion, Kishida has promised that his party will sever any such ties.

In the midst of an anti-communist crusade backed by Abe’s family, Sun Myung Moon founded the Unification Church in South Korea in 1954. The Unification Church received legal recognition as a religious entity in Japan in 1968.

Since the 1980s, the church has been accused of using dishonest business practices and recruitment strategies, including persuading members to give substantial sums of their incomes and possessions to Moon.

The organisation has acknowledged instances of “excessive” donations but claims the issue has been resolved since 2009 when it adopted stronger procedures. Recently, the organisation also committed to further improvements.

According to experts, 70% of the church’s global funding originates from Japan, and Japanese adherents are reportedly encouraged to make up for the sins done by their ancestors during Japan’s colonial rule of the Korean Peninsula from 1910 to 1945.

KEY POINTS:-

  • The Unification Church, whose fundraising methods and close ties to the ruling party outraged the public, is the primary target of a law that Japan’s parliament approved on Saturday that restricts religious and other groups’ malicious donation requests.
  • The long-standing connections between the South Korean-based religious organization and the ruling Liberal Democratic Party in Japan came to light following the murder of former leader Shinzo Abe in July.
  • Due to their mutual support for anti-communist and conservative causes, the church and members of the ruling party have extensive relations, as shown by a police probe.

What is the Unification Church?

In the midst of an anti-communist drive backed by Abe’s grandfather, former Prime Minister Nobusuke Kishi, the Unification Church, established in South Korea in 1954 by Sun Myung Moon, received legal recognition as a religious institution in Japan in 1968.

What is Japan’s New Donation Law?

The Unification Church, whose fundraising methods and close ties to the ruling party outraged the public, is the primary target of a law that Japan’s parliament approved on Saturday that restricts religious and other groups’ malicious donation requests.

What does Kishida’s new military law mean for Japan?

One of Kishida’s primary aims, along with Japan’s new national security strategy and defence policy to achieve significant growth of the military over the following five years, was the approval of the law.

Editors Choice:-

Disclaimer: The material above is being provided solely for informational purposes. Although all information on the Site is provided in good faith, we make no representations or warranties, either stated or implied, as to its correctness, sufficiency, legality, reliability, availability, or completeness.

Leave a Comment